DevOps Success: 7 Essentials You Need to Know

High-performing IT teams are always looking for ways to adopt and use industry best practices and solutions. This enables them to overcome obstacles and achieve consistent and reliable commercial outcomes. A DevOps strategy enables the delivery of software products and services to the market in a more reliable and timely manner. The capacity of the team to have the correct combination of human judgment, culture, procedure, tools, and automation is critical to DevOps success.

Is DevOps the Best Approach for You?

DevOps is a solid framework that aids businesses in getting the most out of their digital efforts. It fosters a productive workplace by enhancing cooperation and value generation across all teams, including development, testing, and operations.

DevOps-savvy companies can launch software solutions more quickly into production, with shorter lead times and reduced failure rates. They have higher levels of responsiveness, are more resilient to production difficulties, and restore failed services more quickly.

However, just because every other IT manager is boasting about their DevOps success stories doesn’t mean you should jump in and try your hand at it. By planning ahead for your DevOps journey, you can avoid the traps that are sure to arise.

Here are seven essentials to keep in mind when you plan your DevOps journey.

1. DevOps necessitates a shift in work culture—manage it actively.

The most important feature of DevOps is the seamless integration of various IT teams to enable efficient execution. It results in a software delivery pipeline known as Continuous Integration-Continuous Delivery (CI/CD). Across development, testing, and operations, you must abandon the traditional silo approach and adopt a collaborative and transparent paradigm. Change is difficult and often met with opposition. It is tough for people to change their working habits overnight. You play an important role in addressing such issues in order to achieve cultural transformation. Be patient, persistent, and use continuous communication to build the necessary change in the management process.

2. DevOps isn’t a fix for capability limitations— it’s a way to improve customer experiences

DevOps isn’t a panacea for all of the problems plaguing your existing software delivery. Mismatches between what upper management expects and what is actually possible must be dealt with individually. DevOps will give you a return on your investment over time. Stakeholder expectations about what it takes to deploy DevOps in their organization should be managed by IT leaders.

Obtain top-level management buy-in and agreement on the DevOps strategy, approach, and plan. Define DevOps KPIs that are both attainable and measurable, and make sure that all stakeholders are aware of them.

3. Keep an eye out for going off-track during the Continuous Deployment Run

Only until you can forecast, track, and measure the end-customer advantages of each code deployment in production can you fully implement DevOps’ continuous deployment approach. In each deployment, focus on the features that are important to the business, their importance, plans, development, testing, and release.

At every stage of DevOps, developers, testers, and operations should all contribute to quality engineering principles. This ensures that continuous deployments are stable and reliable.

4. Restructure your testing team and redefine your quality assurance processes

To match with DevOps practices and culture, you must reimagine your testing life cycle process. To adapt and incorporate QA methods into every phase of DevOps, your testing staff needs to be rebuilt and retrained into a quality assurance regimen. Efforts must be oriented toward preventing or catching bugs in the early stages of development, as well as assisting in making every release of code into production reliable, robust, and fit for the company.

DevOps testing teams must evolve from a reactive, bug-hunting team to a proactive, customer-focused, and multi-skilled workforce capable of assisting development and operations.

5. Incorporate security practices earlier in the software development life cycle (SDLC)

Security is typically considered near the end of the IT value chain. This is primarily due to the lack of security knowledge among most development and testing teams. Information security’s confidentiality, integrity, and availability must be ingrained from the start of your SDLC to ensure that the code in production is secure against penetration, vulnerabilities, and threats.

Adopt and use methods and technologies to help your system become more resilient and self-healing. Integrating DevSecOps into DevOps cycles will allow you to combine security-focused mindsets, cultures, processes, tools, and methodologies across your software development life cycle.

6. Only use tools and automation when absolutely necessary

It’s not about automating everything in your software development life cycle with DevOps. DevOps emphasizes automation and the use of tools to improve agility, productivity, and quality. However, in the hurry to automate, one should not overlook the value and significance of the human judgment. From business research to production monitoring, the team draws vital insights and collective intelligence through constant and seamless collaborative efforts that can’t be substituted by any tool or automation.

Managers, developers, testers, security experts, operations, and support teams must collaborate to choose which technologies to utilize and which automation areas to automate. Automate tasks like code walkthroughs, unit testing, integration testing, build verification, regression testing, environment builds, and code deployments that are repetitive.

7. DevOps is still maturing, and there is no standard way to implement it

DevOps is continuously changing, and there is no one-size-fits-all approach or strategy for implementing it. DevOps implementations may be defined, interpreted, and conceptualized differently by different teams within the same organization. This could cause misunderstanding in your organization regarding all of your DevOps transformation efforts. For your company’s demands, you’ll need to develop a consistent method and plan. It’s preferable if you make sure all relevant voices are heard and ideas are distilled in order to produce a consistent plan and approach for your company. Before implementing DevOps methods across the board, conduct research, experiment, and run pilot projects.

(Originally published in Stickyminds)

Working with Test Driven Development

A technique for using automated unit test scenarios to design and decoupling of dependencies is called Test Driven Development. This technique is heavily used in Agile development methodologies. To use this technique with Visual Studio Team System, you have to understand the following topics:

  • Creating and running automated tests inside the VSTS IDE
  • Abstracting dependencies in an object-oriented world
  • Re-factoring new and old features to remove duplication in the code

The main theme of TDD is “Red, Green, Refactor.”

  • To work with TDD you must have a Test Project solution for creating new test cases in VSTS and it should reference the class library where you are adding new functionality.

Follow these steps to perform TDD:

  1. Understand the requirements of the user story and feature that you are working on.
  2. Red: Create a test and make it fail.
    1. Write the test for already existed code and change the logic of the code to make our test fail.
    2. Run the test case. It should fail. This means your test is calling the correct code and that the code is not working by properly. This is a meaningful failure, and you expect it to fail.
  3. Green: Make the test pass
    1. Initially hard code the expected return value to verify success after that write the correct logic of code to make the test pass.
    2. If you’ve written the code so that the test passes as intended, you are finished. You do not have to write more code speculatively. If new functionality is still needed, then another test is needed. Make this one test pass and continue.
    3. When the test passes, you might want to run all tests up to this point to build confidence that everything else is still working.
  4. Refactor: Change the code to remove duplication in your project and to improve the design while ensuring that all tests still pass.
    1. Remove duplication caused by the addition of the new functionality
    2. Make design changes to improve the overall solution.
    3. After each refactoring, rerun all the tests to ensure that they all still pass.

Advantages of Test-Driven Development

  • When the unit test case passes success and logic of the code is refactored to remove duplicate code.
  • The unit tests will not expire until you separate documentation and this will feedback that each component is still working.
  • TDD will help the Developer to understand the complete design and critical analysis of requirements to work with the logic of code and get an accurate result.
  • Any software developed using TDD can be maintained easily, better designed.
  • If a bug is found, the developer should create a test to reveal the bug and then modify the logic of the code until successive test run, all old bugs is verified and Reduced debugging time.

Limitations

  • Due to extensive use of test cases, all code logic is not executed success or failure properly.
  • Some Security Issues for Integration testing and Compliance testing

Read about Behavior Driven Development here.

Trigent’s experienced and versatile Quality Assurance and Testing team is a major contributor to the successful launch, upgrade, and maintenance of quality software used by millions around the globe. Our experienced responsible testing practices put process before convenience to delight stakeholders with an impressive industry rivaled Defect Escape Ratio or DER of 0.2.