Tech Trends Driving Higher Education in 2021 and Beyond

The campuses that were bustling with life a year ago now have a deserted look. The dormitories, classrooms, and practical rooms all wait for normalcy to return. The pandemic has impacted all walks of life, and the universities are no different. As per the latest New York Times survey comprising 1,900 American colleges and universities, there have been 397000 cases and about 90 deaths due to the coronavirus.

The explosion of the virus and the regulations to curb the spread have expedited the adoption of technology. Universities that were warming up to technology before the pandemic are now swiftly embracing technology to overcome the pandemic’s challenges and chart out their future course of action.

Here are the top trending technologies that have got the education industry’s attention and are sure to have a long-standing impact on the education industry and system.

AI drives operational and administrative efficiency

AI’s impact on the education sector or specifically in higher learning institutes can be manifold. Many universities or institutions are already leveraging AI to deliver time-sensitive academic and admin tasks, increase enrollment, improve IT processes and amplify the learning experience. A Wall Street Journal article noted that the Georgia Institute of Technology addressed 40% of student’s queries using an AI-powered chatbot assistant freeing up humans to tackle complex questions. AI could also spell good news for students with hearing and visual impairments by refining language translations and providing improved access.

While AI’s potential has been a topic of discussion at institutions, its adoption in the education industry is still lagging. A 2019 survey revealed that implementation was the most significant challenge institutions faced in adopting AI. Only 41% of universities have chalked out a strategy on utilizing AI. Another major deterrent is the cost involved, with 57% of institutions having a separate budget for AI projects.

Hybrid learning delivers continuity, convenience, and safety

With the contagious virus on the prowl student, health and safety have become priorities for institutions. The learning environment is poised for a significant overhaul. Hybrid learning or blended learning is the best option available to institutions. The students’ young age on campus is another reason hybrid learning is a perfect fit for the current day and age. Statistics from Bill and Melinda Foundation reveal the 55% of today’s college and university students are Gen Zers. The new generation of students is well averse to using technology. Pew Research highlighted that 95% of Gen Zers have access to smartphones while close to 97% use one of the major learning platforms.

A recently concluded survey by the Institute of International Education has revealed that 9 out of 10 universities in the US plan to implement the hybrid learning model across their campuses. 92% of institutions participating in the survey suggested looking at a wholly revamped instructional plan starting fall 2020.

Immersive, engaging, and impactful learning experiences using AR/VR

Not long ago, the thought of remote learning, especially for higher education, was a distant dream. The biggest challenge to any such suggestion was the impact of in-person classes conducted by the professor in charge, the face-to-face interactions, live demonstrations, and the practical sessions. The emergence of the coronavirus and the social distancing regulation compelled colleges to go digital. Every need has a solution. In this case, the need for real conversations, universities turned to AR/VR that had already made inroads into the classroom. As per Burroughs, 2018 and Internet2, 2019, as of 2018, 18% of universities and colleges had fully deployed VR, 28% had used it to some extent, and 32% were testing the technology. Gartner predicts that by 2021, 60 higher education institutions in the United States will focus on using VR to create simulations and put students into immersive environments.

Through its Virtual Immersive Teaching and Learning (VITaL), San Diego State University’s Instructional Technology Services is using VR capabilities to teach students astronomy. Students in Western Carolina University’s (NC) School of Nursing are using VR to virtually attend to rare emergencies and understand how to attend to such instances. In another compelling use case, Fordham University’s (NY) Gabelli School of Business teaches its students lessons in leadership and teamwork using VR. Students in this particular exercise walk on a 1400 foot skyscraper urged by team members or guided by fellow students to diffuse bombs.

Robust ‘anywhere’ learning systems with cloud technologies

Campuses are sophisticated systems similar to bustling cities. Apart from learning systems, they provide transportation, campus safety, accounting, administration, and everything else required to run a well-oiled system for the residents, in this case, the students. All these facilities provided by the institutions need to run cohesively. Embracing the cloud enables institutions to create a data-centric mindset and rely more on quantifiable data measurement to drive and assess enrollment functions. Institutions are adopting cloud products to leap towards process re-engineering to aim for system-wide digital transformation. The approach will reduce information silos and enable standardization of data driving information sharing, boosting efficiency and sustainable growth.

The pandemic has put an enormous financial burden on institutions. Budget cuts for public institutions and diminishing private funds and endowments have further crippled institutions’ financial capability to harness cloud capabilities helping colleges and universities balance their expenses while benefiting from the high-standard IT services.

The Julliard School for performing arts having its physical presence in New York, will be training 800 students from 42 different countries. The faculty will be training all these students from its campus in Manhattan. The cloud powers Julliard’s digital foray.

Conclusion

Like every other industry, the higher education domain needs a revamp. Campuses across the United States are increasing digital transformation speed to face any unforeseen eventuality. Trigent is at the forefront of enabling institutions and universities to quickly and efficiently utilize technology advances. Our domain expertise empowers institutions to promptly ramp-up capabilities backed by our technology experts.

Let us together build a digitally strong foundation for an empowered future. Call us today.

Cloud: a lifeline for the healthcare Industry

The healthcare industry has been steadily expanding, owing to a rising aging population and the growing trend of wellness centers. With a pandemic in the mix, however, the industry has been left burdened and unprepared. The silver lining here is that people have embraced telehealth services. With the onset of Covid 19, the number of users accessing e-healthcare services has catapulted. Doctors can now provide remote care to patients from the safety of their homes, making life easier for everybody involved.

Cloud has played a heroic role in these trying times. Even those that swear by traditional systems established regulations, processes, and operational methods, have had to make the mental, cultural, and ultimately, physical switch to the Cloud. Admittedly for them, the pros outweigh the cons.

Saving time, reducing costs, increasing efficiency

When Hunterdon Healthcare, a healthcare center in New Jersey, migrated to the Cloud, they saved $1.3 million in IT costs. With a Cloud-based system, tasks are simplified, making the turnaround quick and seamless. Processes are streamlined, thereby eliminating silos and enhancing resource utilization. Cloud-based technology brings with it a sense of ease and convenience, cutting down administrative and hardware costs in the process. In hospitals that use legacy systems, a lot of time and effort is lost on manual data collection and transfer, notwithstanding the additional costs invoked by human error. Cloud brings operational efficiency into play – giving patients better care and healthcare organizations a better bottom line. While there is an initial cost incurred to transform legacy systems into Cloud-based ones, in the long run, the cost of running the latter is much lower. Right now, as physicians, nurses, and other healthcare workers are (at best) experiencing exhaustion, Cloud-based systems are proving to be a necessary, life-saving investment.

Interoperability and collaboration

Interoperability between hospitals, diagnostic centers, clinics, dispensaries, pharmacies, etc., is perhaps the biggest advantage of Cloud. Different information technology systems can communicate with each other, making it easy to compile a complete and comprehensive patient history record – this helps physicians make informed decisions. Further, with Cloud, one can access patient data and other applications remotely – this drastically scales the reach of medicine, especially to rural areas. Research into Covid 19 has shown that individuals with pre-existing conditions and compromised immunity are more susceptible to the virus. When testing for Covid 19, access to one’s complete medical records helps doctors prioritize cases and provide care accordingly.

Real-time remote care

Transcending time, distance and other variables, cloud-enabled IT relays real-time information, which cuts down the time, cost and effort involved in physically going to a healthcare facility, waiting for an appointment, etc. Real-time e-diagnosis has been widely helpful amidst the pandemic, ensuring that people do not unnecessarily put themselves at risk by visiting hospitals for non-Covid-related medical issues. Instead, complying with social distancing norms, telehealth services help doctors communicate directly with patients, and make a diagnosis (and if necessary, a treatment plan) without putting either party at risk. Research by McKinsey and Company shows that out of a number of people that had canceled medical appointments during the lockdown, 44% accessed telehealth options. They also found that online searches for telemedicine increased more than ninefold. Since Cloud-based healthcare facilities keep track of the numerous technological advances in medicine, it helps improve patient outcomes, giving them an advantage over facilities that do not use Cloud services.

Data security on cloud

The biggest apprehension with cloud-based systems is data security. The confidentiality and security of one’s medical data is an obvious concern, but Cloud systems can reduce risks by complying with regulations and policies like GDPR (General Data Protection Regulation) and HIPAA (Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act).

Skilled personnel

Other worries include internet connectivity issues, unskilled personnel, and worries over a lack of the ‘human’ element. The implementation of training programs will help familiarize staff with the workings of Cloud systems. As for the human element or the lack thereof, it is important to note that like with everything else in the service industry, healthcare too, has had to be tailored to suit consumer expectations in terms of speed, comfort, etc. If anything, therefore, Cloud-based systems provide patients with a value-based service.

Although it took a pandemic to catalyze the industry’s adoption of cloud services, there is no denying that it is the future of healthcare. The benefits and undiscovered potential of Cloud could redefine diagnoses, treatments, and more. Trigent helps healthcare organizations that are at any Cloud maturity stage – whether it is on an advisory level, migrating from a legacy system to the Cloud, developing a particular application, adapting portfolios to match the evolved Cloud architecture or any other Cloud service.

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Ref:

  • Siwicki, B. (2019). Hunterdon Healthcare migrates to Google Cloud/G Suite and saves $1.3 million.
  • Fabius, V., Kohli, S., Timelin, B., & Veranen, S. (2020). Meet the next-normal consumer.

Evolve into a Cloud-Native culture

Why go Cloud Native?

Cloud-Native is one of the biggest trends in the software industry today. The cloud-native approach works for modernizing existing applications and building new applications.

Cloud-native application takes advantage of cloud computing models to increase speed, flexibility, and quality and reduce deployment risks. The key factor to consider here is how applications are built, deployed, and managed.

As a platform-agnostic application, it is easy to manage iterative improvements using Agile & DevOps processes.

1. From a legacy system into the cloud
Organizations who moved from the legacy system into the cloud may face certain challenges. The legacy backup and disaster recovery tools used in old-school data centers do not work in cloud-native environments. Considering that the responsibility for data, processes, data management, maintenance, troubling shooting rests with the business, and not the cloud service provider, cloud-native is the way to go.

2. Rebuild technology foundation
Organizations that wish to make technological changes but do not have the luxury of rebuilding their technology foundation can adopt the Cloud Native approach. They stand to gain significantly by making gradual and fundamental shifts in their culture, processes, and technology to become cloud-native.

3. Innovation & Speed
As software is key to how consumers engage with businesses, innovation and speed have become imperative to their survival and growth. Businesses benefit from the cloud-native approach that gives them the ability to improve the quality of applications, reduces deployment risks, and improves the time to market.

Benefits of Cloud Native

Benefits of Cloud-Native

The building blocks of Cloud Native apps

Whether the challenge is in creating a new Cloud Native app or upgrading an existing one, organizations need to consider these essential building blocks of a Cloud Native ecosystem.

1. Microservices architecture for continuous improvement
The process breaks applications down to single-function services called microservices. Microservices are loosely coupled but remain independent. They allow incremental, automated, and continuous improvement of an application without causing downtime.

2. Containers for flexibility and scalability
Containers package software with all its code and dependencies in one place allowing the software to run anywhere – on a desktop, traditional IT, or the cloud. This allows maximum flexibility and portability in a multi-cloud environment. Containers allow fast scaling up or down with Kubernetes orchestration defined by the user.

3. Kubernetes for cost-effective Cloud Native development
The container orchestration platform enables scheduling and automating the deployment, management, and scaling of containerized applications. Kubernetes is versatile and offers a breadth of functionality, vast open-source of supporting tools, and portability across leading cloud service providers.

4. Agile methods in DevOps processes
Application development for the Cloud-Native approach follows Agile methods and DevOps principles with a focus on building and delivering apps collaboratively by development, quality assurance, security, IT operations, and delivery teams.

Are you ready for the Cloud Native journey?

The path to Cloud Native is unique to each organization depending on their stage in cloud maturity and business goals. Before beginning the Cloud-Native journey, consider these factors.

Cloud applications

1. Cloud-enabled
A cloud-enabled application was developed for deployment in a traditional data center but it was later changed so that it could run in a cloud environment.
Cloud-Native applications are designed to be platform-agnostic and are scalable.

2. Cloud-ready
The cloud-ready application works in the cloud environment or a traditional app that has been reconfigured for a cloud environment.
Cloud-Native apps are developed from the beginning to work only in the cloud and take advantage of cloud architecture.

Business objectives

1. Develop new Cloud Native apps – Organizations can quickly respond to new opportunities with the Cloud Native approach to building new applications.

2. Modernize existing apps – Many valuable applications are critical to business operations and revenue. They may not be easily replaceable. Applications are portable from on-premise infrastructure to the cloud and re-architected to become Cloud Native.

3. Improve app delivery – Container-based automation can accelerate the app delivery cycle.

4. Drive business innovation – For businesses whose success depends on constant innovation, introducing new features, Cloud Native tools support innovation, new ways to deliver solutions faster.

As Cloud Native technologies grow, businesses that wish to keep pace with competition and stay relevant in the future need to start right now. Evolution towards cloud-native effects design, implementation, deployment, operation of applications. Being prepared for the next big technological wave by making the shift today is essential.

Trigent Cloud Services team handholds businesses to leverage the advantages of the cloud for next-gen business requirements. Our experts help in building scalable, reliable, secure, flexible cloud-based apps in the native environment by leveraging Cloud-Native features of AWS, Microsoft Azure, and Google Cloud Platform.

Among other Cloud Services, our portfolio includes Cloud Architecture and Cloud Managed Services with a key focus on Cloud Native applications.

Take the next step in the cloud journey – get in touch with our experts for a business consultation.


Sources:
https://www.ibm.com/cloud/learn/cloud-native
Red Hat – the path to cloud-native applications

Trigent Recognized as Top Cloud Consultants 2020

The numerous possibilities in adopting cloud services in your business can sometimes be overwhelming. Here at Trigent, our vision is to help businesses realize the full potential of cloud, irrespective of their maturity stage in the cloud journey.

Thanks to its cloud-led strategy, Trigent has empowered organizations to drive business acceleration, connected insights, and customer experience. We help them maximize their returns from their cloud investments by building impactful and disruptive cloud-based offerings. We understand legacy infrastructure and applications, having been in the business for over two decades. This puts us in a strong position to modernize legacy applications through the cloud, SaaS, and microservices building blocks.

In recognition of our proven success in cloud transformation, we’re delighted to announce that we’ve been named by Clutch as one of the top Cloud Consultants in 2020! Clutch is a company list resource that helps connect businesses with the best-fit agencies or consultants they need for their next big business challenge. Clutch cuts through disorganized market research by collecting client feedback and analyzing industry data, arming businesses with the insights and analysis they need to connect and tackle challenges with confidence.

We’re delighted to have harnessed cloud to help businesses improve their results across KPIs such as employee productivity, operational efficiency, growth, and profitability.

6-Step Framework for Your Cloud Strategy

Cloud adoption just keeps on growing and it’s time to take control. Gartner predicts “By 2021, more than half of global enterprises already using cloud today will adopt an all-in cloud strategy.” Nevertheless, just moving your workloads to the cloud does not make them more efficient for your business. When you decide to embark on a cloud journey, you need to have a cloud strategy in place.

A cloud strategy defines the business outcomes you are looking for, and how you are going to get there. It also explores your end goals and motivation for adopting the cloud. Your deciding factors could be many – cost, innovation, your need for business growth, keep up with your competitors. You also need to define business outcomes, establish governance, and control.

Strategies to transform your business into the digital world

The key component of a cloud strategy is a framework so you can evaluate the benefits and challenges of adopting the cloud approach.

Here’s a six-step framework for a successful cloud strategy:

  • Identify and understand the key area where cloud can deliver business benefits for your organization
  • Plan and optimize your cloud strategy
  • Understand common cloud challenges and how to overcome them
  • Identify and develop cloud competencies
  • Prepare your organization for the shift
  • Learn the capabilities of the integrated products that can manage the cloud

Let’s take a look at a few cloud computing strategies:

  • What type of cloud: A careful consideration should be done while selecting the cloud – Private cloud or public cloud or hybrid. You need to understand and evaluate the pros and cons of each available option.
  • Plan your budget: According to what type of cloud you choose to fit your business needs, choose your IT support backbone. You also have to invest in hiring the proper workforce for cloud development.
  • Value your options and choose: Most businesses view the cloud as an enabler of process improvement and a means of reducing costs. You need to see what do you want the cloud to accomplish and what your business will gain from the shift?
  • Technology: After you have done considering your needs and the budget and resources available for your cloud shift, you need to look at the best technology stack available.
  • Choose the right cloud service provider: Most cloud service providers offers hosting needs. Keeping in mind your go-to-market strategy, choose a cloud vendor that is a one-stop-shop for all your cloud-based needs.

Trigent can help you develop the right cloud solution to transform your business. Through our Cloud Adoption Maturity Model, we determine the maturity of your organization’s cloud adoption.

With our Cloud Advisory Services, we assess your current IT infrastructure, the applications you use, costs, and resources. We help you adopt a cloud-first strategy and deployment models and then chart out-migration road-maps with minimal disruption time.

Derive true business benefits with us. Watch this explainer video to explore how our cloud solutions define and complement your cloud strategy.

Cloud-based Transportation Management System: A Game Changer in Logistics Industry

Read how you can make your TMS more competitive.

Technological advances have brought rapid changes to the transportation and logistics sector.
For businesses with complex supply chains, a cloud-based TMS can unlock new levels of efficiency, improve opportunities for automation and data consistency.

According to a new market report published by Credence Research, Inc., “Transportation Management Systems Market” the global transportation management systems market is expected to grow at a CAGR of 9.8% during the forecast period 2015 – 2022.

Benefits of TMS

  • Plan, manage and optimize the daily operations of transportation across geographies
  • Reduce invoice errors by automating the freight payment and audit processes
  • Provide transport intelligence to improve service delivery and reduce cost
  • Increase delivery reliability through collaboration across all modes and providers

Cloud-based Transportation Management System

TMS is not a new concept, but when hosted in the cloud (often as SaaS), is still new to the Shipping industry. With SaaS TMS, there are no costly upgrades, businesses have access to complete and accurate information, and collaboration is faster.

This next-generation of cloud-based TMS gives remarkable benefits to:

  • Shippers – Can gain a global view of transportation in real-time, including order information for each vehicle and its routing progress.
  • Supply chain managers – Streamlining all supply chain activities and make better decisions based on real-time data.
  • Vendors – By eliminating the labor and upfront investment that traditional software implementations require.
  • Logistic Service Providers (LSPs) – Seamlessly connect with their network, optimize all web-based transport management system modes, provide the proper metrics needed to manage their businesses.

Trigent enables “logistics–as-a-service” (SaaS) business models for TMS providers. Our services facilitate flexible integrations with other key business processes to optimize all operations.

Our cloud-based TMS services provide flexibility and scalability, as well as standardized and harmonized processes across the whole organization, which is especially important for LSPs or carriers who have grown through acquisitions, and currently, rely on a patchwork of legacy systems.

Successfully Delivered 30+ Digital Transformation Projects in the Last 10 Years

For the modernization of legacy TMS applications, we start by understanding your unique business requirements and help create a roadmap. By establishing a phase-wise project plan, reinforced with industry best practices and structured processes, the migration will be well planned, executed, and supported. Read more about our Cloud Transformation services.

Using a cloud-based transportation management system will help your supply chain operate the best it can. Embrace SaaS TMS and stay ahead of the competition with Trigent.

Single or Multi-cloud?

A recent study by 451 Research indicates that nearly a third of large organizations work with four or more cloud vendors, making one wonder whether multi-cloud is the future of cloud computing. The recent acquisition by Google of Orbitera, a platform that supports multi-cloud commerce, shows that Google recognizes that multi-cloud environments are the future. In a market estimated by Gartner to be worth $240 billion next year, multi-cloud creates a new front in the so-called “cloud computing wars.” This can only be good news for those businesses looking for flexibility, cost savings, and ultimately better solutions.

It appears that organizations that prefer multiple cloud providers have very logical reasons for this. They use multiple cloud providers to support specific applications or workloads. For example, a core application may need more resilience to perform when power is lost or expand to capacity and another department within the same organization may need the cloud to enhance productivity. Having one single cloud solution may compromise its outcome, which is probably why large companies with multiple functions may end up with several clouds. Another reason, as per a report by Ovum, seems to be overall dissatisfaction with a single cloud service provider. Key reasons cited include poor service performance and a lack of personalized support.

Related: We build impactful cloud solutions that solve challenging business problems.

One more reason could be that companies vary of keeping all their applications and workflows in one single cloud, because it can leave them vulnerable and reduce their pricing negotiation powers with the provider, in the long term.

While the logic behind a multi-cloud environment may seem sensible, the fact remains that it can be difficult to jostle between clouds. While cloud providers make it easy to move applications to their platforms, leaving it is not easy, to ensure that their business is not reduced to a price-sensitive commodity.

Also, some organizations are worried about the downtime involved in moving petabytes of data

Many organizations are rightly concerned about the downtime involved in moving petabytes of data between cloud providers. Fortunately, the same patented Active Data Replication technology that all the major cloud vendors offer to make it simple for customers to move to the cloud can also be used to migrate data between the clouds.

The ramifications of this are huge. While Amazon Web Services (AWS) remains the dominant player in the space, businesses wanting the freedom to juggle multiple cloud services and avoid vendor lock-in may well help the other players to catch up.

Comments welcome!

Understanding Microsoft Azure Storage

Before you understand Microsoft Azure’s storage capabilities, here’s a primer on Microsoft’s multi-tenant cloud-based directory and identity management service, Azure Active Directory.

Cloud storage platform is designed for Internet-scale applications. It is highly reliable, available, and scalable. On average, we can manage more than 40 trillion stored objects and 3.5 million requests/sec. As a result of its scalability, it is possible to store a large volume of data. If you combine this with the necessary system allocation, you can achieve remarkable good performance. Window storages are especially durable, in my opinion. Remember however that the cost of storage is key to cloud storage, and we need to pay for both storage and transfer bandwidth on the basis of actual usage. The data and Microsoft Azure storage are available via the REST interface, so we can access the same from all programming languages.

The Microsoft Azure platform divides into four types of standard storages which work with different scenarios:

  1. Blobs
  2. Tables
  3. Queues
  4. Files

It can expose via REST APIs and with multiple client libraries like .Net, C++, Java, Node.js, Android, etc.

According to 2015 data, Azure storage is available in 19 different regions globally.

Microsoft Azure available in different regions

Image1: Azure storage available in different regions

Blobs

Blob storage is useful for sharing documents, images, video, music and to store raw data/logs.

We can interact blob storage with REST interface (Put, Get, and Delete).

Code sample:

// Retrieve storage account from connection string.
 CloudStorageAccount storageAccount = CloudStorageAccount.Parse(CloudConfigurationManager.GetSetting("StorageConnectionString"));
 // Create the blob client.
 CloudBlobClient blobClient = storageAccount.CreateCloudBlobClient();
 // Retrieve a reference to a container.
 CloudBlobContainer container = blobClient.GetContainerReference("deepakcontainer");
 // Create the container if it doesn't already exist.
 container.CreateIfNotExists();
 // Retrieve reference to a blob named "myblob".
 CloudBlockBlob blockBlob = container.GetBlockBlobReference("deepakblob");
 // Create or overwrite the "myblob" blob with contents from a local file.
 using(var fileStream = System.IO.File.OpenRead(@ "pathmyfile")) {
 blockBlob.UploadFromStream(fileStream);
 }

In Code we are referencing to a storage account. We need to create a blob client proxy which will interact with blob object. Then we can upload from the client to the cloud. We need to create a container to organize the blob. If container is not available, we need to create a container the first time we use it.

There are three types of blobs: Block blobs, Append blobs, and Page blobs (disks).

Block blobs are optimized for streaming and storing cloud objects, and are a good choice for storing documents, media files, backups etc.

Append blobs are similar to block blobs, but are optimized for append operations. An append blob can be updated only by adding a new block at the end. Append blobs are a good choice for scenarios such as logging, where new data needs to be written only at the end of the blob.

Page blobs are optimized for representing IaaS disks and supporting random writes. An Azure virtual machine network attached to IaaS disk is a Virtual Hard Disk stored as a page blob.

Tables

This is a massively scalable NoSql key/value storage. It is very useful for storing a large volume of metadata. This storage platform automatically load balances between new tables as you allocate more resources. It is very scalable. Azure tables are ideal for storing structured, non-relational data.

We can use Table storage to store flexible datasets, such as user data for web applications, address books, device information, and any other type of metadata that your service requires. You can store any number of entities in a table, and a storage account may contain any number of tables, up to the capacity limit of the storage account. We can Access data using the OData protocol and LINQ queries with WCF Data Service .NET Libraries.

Code sample:

// Retrieve the storage account from the connection string.
 CloudStorageAccount storageAccount = CloudStorageAccount.Parse(CloudConfigurationManager.GetSetting("StorageConnectionString"));
 // Create the table client.CloudTableClient tableClient = storageAccount.CreateCloudTableClient();
 // Retrieve a reference to the table.CloudTable table = tableClient.GetTableReference("deepak");
 // Create the table if it doesn't exist.
 table.CreateIfNotExists();

Queues

It is an efficient solution for reliable applications, low latency and it is a high throughput messaging system. It basically uses decouple components and uses web role to worker role communication. It also implements scheduling of asynchronous tasks. It stores a large number of messages, in any format, of up to 64 KB. The maximum time that a message can remain in the queue is seven days.

Code sample:

// Retrieve storage account from connection string.
 CloudStorageAccount storageAccount = CloudStorageAccount.Parse(CloudConfigurationManager.GetSetting("StorageConnectionString"));
 // Create the queue client.
 CloudQueueClient queueClient = storageAccount.CreateCloudQueueClient();
 // Retrieve a reference to a queue.
 CloudQueue queue = queueClient.GetQueueReference("deepakqueue");
 // Create the queue if it doesn't already exist.
 queue.CreateIfNotExists();
 // Create a message and add it to the queue.
 CloudQueueMessage message = new CloudQueueMessage("Hello, Trigent");
 queue.AddMessage(message);

File

We can use file storage to share the file. It is very useful to move on-premises application to cloud.

It support REST and SMP protocol access to same file share.

File storage contains the below components:

Code sample:

// Create a CloudFileClient object for credentialed access to File storage.
 CloudFileClient fileClient = storageAccount.CreateCloudFileClient();
 // Get a reference to the file share we created previously.
 CloudFileShare share = fileClient.GetShareReference("logs");
 // Ensure that the share exists.
 if (share.Exists()) {
 // Get a reference to the root directory for the share.
 CloudFileDirectory rootDir = share.GetRootDirectoryReference();
 // Get a reference to the directory we created previously.
 CloudFileDirectory sampleDir = rootDir.GetDirectoryReference("CustomLogs");
 // Ensure that the directory exists.
 if (sampleDir.Exists()) {
 // Get a reference to the file we created previously.
 CloudFile file = sampleDir.GetFileReference("Log1.txt");
 // Ensure that the file exists.
 if (file.Exists()) {
 // Write the contents of the file to the console window.
 Responsed.Write(file.DownloadTextAsync().Result);
 }
 }
 }

Speak to our cloud experts to learn what Microsoft Azure can do for your organization.